Thursday, December 3, 2009

In That World

Saw 'The Invention of Lying' at the movies yesterday with a friend and quite enjoyed it. Ricky Gervais is hilarious and it had a nice storyline as well as an abundance of famous faces amongst the cast, but the thing that I am caught up on is the basic premise. It is set in a world that is identical to our own except that people are genetically hardwired to be unable to lie - they don't even have a word for lying, nor for truth because everything is true and that's all they know because there is nothing to compare it with.

There are, of course, some distinct disadvantages to this, such as not having lies technically means not having fiction therefore all of the movies in that world are about historical events and are just famous people reading out the stories, because acting, if you think about it, is also kind of like lying. BUT, the rest of the world was wonderful. People said the most blunt and potentially offensive things but no one seems to mind because it is really the truth anyway and there is so much less conflict because you always know where you stand.

I want to live in that world.

4 comments:

Jac said...

I am so looking forward to seeing that movie. I love Ricky Gervais, he was hilarious in Ghost Town too. Have you seen that? I think he's the only total as*hole that's actually likeable, hehe :)

Anonymous said...

most people cannot take the truth - the social filter as you have said before is really necessary - I dont think we are ready yet for the whole and total truth in most cases - but you are right it would make the world far less complicated.w.w

Wendy said...

Yep, Jac, I loved Ghost Town, too! Have you seen him in Extras and the UK Office - so funny!

Ha, Renata - using my own words against me ☺ Yes, I guess an honest world and a world without social filters do go hand in hand and you're right, that might not be such a good thing.

Rob-bear said...

Do we need social filters, or a clear understanding of the context in which the truth is being spoken?

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